EP REVIEW: The Weeknd – My Dear Melancholy, 

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Over the years The Weeknd has shifted his sound towards a mainstream polish which has seen him top the charts multiple times, sell out arenas across the world, release his own clothing line and become one of the biggest names in R&B. Some of his long-term fans have said that we’ve lost the old Abel because the passion and emotion which was very apparent in his early material has just been replaced with production. And to be honest that statement is kind of true but he’s decided to prove everyone wrong and release a surprise EP of emotionally raw tracks. “My Dear Melancholy,” hears him returning to his original sound and showing everyone that the old Abel hasn’t gone anywhere. EP opener “Call Out My Name” is easily the EP’s strongest and most emotional track. We hear him confessing that he’s struggling moving on from his ex-girlfriend even though he knows that she didn’t put in as much effort as he did. The lyrics are emotionally raw and will break your heart on the first listen. “Call out my name when I kiss you so gently. I want you to stay, I want you to stay even though you don’t want me”. The moody production is amplified by his echoing vocals that haunt you right to the end. The song’s topic is revisited again on the second best song “Wasted Times”. It’s just as raw and details the next step which is the issue of moving on because your mind keeps wandering. “And now I’m askin’, who do you belong to now? Who you give that love to now? Who you pullin’ up on?”. But then his attitude switches towards a sassier side proclaiming “I ain’t got no business catchin’ feelings”. These two songs set the tone for the 6 track collection with “Try Me” and “Privellage” offering a slight hip-hop influenced production while “Hurt You” and “I Was Never There” incorporates shiny synths. This EP has definitely been made with his old-school fans in mind that have been begging him to revisit this sound for the past couple  of years. They are going to be ecstatic. As for his pop fans, they are probably going to skip through this record and go back to “Starboy”. 

 

 

 

 

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